SecretLab Titan Gaming Chair


It’s easy to look at gaming chairs as nearly identical, just from different manufacturers. They’re all shaped similarly and priced around the same $300 to $500 range. Capacity is a factor, but besides that the biggest differences between chairs are their materials and build quality. SecretLab’s $399 Titan is the nicest gaming chair we’ve tested yet based on those criteria. It looks similar to other gaming chairs, but its thick, supple polyurethane cover and remarkably generous, dense cold cure foam padding make it stand above others in quality, and earn it our Editors’ Choice.

Size

Like the name implies, the Titan is SecretLab’s largest chair, and suitable for users up to 290 pounds. That’s quite a bit less than the AKRacing Max, which has a maximum capacity of 400 pounds. But the Max is built for bigger players, and anyone half that size will find themselves swimming in it. I’m a fairly large user at 250 pounds, and found the Titan’s 22-inch-wide seat very comfortable without being too large.

As for styling, the Titan is available in Stealth (all-black), Amber (black with orange accents), Ash (gray with black accents), and Tempo (blue with light blue and white accents).

SecretLab Titan Gaming Chair

Assembly

Like most gaming chairs, the Titan comes disassembled. You can put it together yourself, but you’ll have an easier time with an extra pair of hands to help you. First, remove the four bolts from the sides of the back of the chair. Brace the back against the metal brackets on the seat and screw the bolts back in to attach the two halves of the chair. Flip the chair over and bolt the upper base onto the underside of the seat. Put the five castors in the five holes on the underside of the lower base and insert the pneumatic cylinder into the middle of it. Turn the chair upright and place the upper base onto the top of the cylinder. After that, all you have to do is put the plastic paddles on the metal arms on the upper base to let you adjust the chair, and attach the plastic covers on the sides of the back of the chair to protect the metal brackets.

Unlike other gaming chairs we’ve tested, the Titan only comes with one removable cushion, a soft, velour-covered rectangular headrest that slips over the top of the back of the chair. Instead of a separate lumbar support cushion, the Titan has an internal lumbar support you can adjust with a knob on the side of the chair. It doesn’t change the shape of the chair so much as firms or softens where the back of the chair meets your lower back, so don’t expect it to serve as a replacement for the separate cushion included with other gaming chairs. It’s a nice adjustment, though, and you can easily add your own additional lumbar support or pillow. The headrest pillow is a bit softer than the vinyl and faux leather headrests that come with other gaming chairs.

Materials

The Titan is covered in a thick PU (polyurethane) leather on the seat and back. It’s a sturdy material, secured to very firm cold-cure foam padding and held together with red stitching (for the black model). We can’t predict how the faux leather will hold up to long-term wear and tear, but it feels solid and durable. The armrests are covered in PU rubber, and attach to the base of the chair with solid steel arms. The upper base is also steel, while the lower base is solid aluminum. The casters’ wheels are coated in PU rubber, which will help prevent wear of hardwood floors (a problem I’ve noticed with my home office chair and its plastic-covered metal casters).

SecretLab Titan Gaming Chair

Adjustments

The Titan is easily adjustable, with all the standard tweaks you find on gaming chairs in this price range. The seat itself can be lifted or lowered using the right paddle switch on the base, setting the seat between 19.5 and 23 inches from the floor. You can also recline back on the chair by pulling the handbrake-like lever behind the right armrest, setting its angle between 85 and 165 degrees. The Titan can’t fold all the way back to lay flat like some gaming chairs, but it’s a generous recline that keeps everything balanced, which isn’t always the case with flat-folding chairs and larger users. The left paddle switch on the base locks the chair’s height and pitch.

The armrests can be adjusted fairly easily and set to multiple angles. They’ll always lay flat under your arms, but you can yaw them left or right by 15 degrees with a twist. Pressing a button on each armrest lets you slide them forward or backward, and releasing the button locks the armrest in place. This is a very nice feature compared with AKRacing and DXRacer chairs, which have similar adjustments but don’t lock, and can be easily moved with casual use. The trade-off is that you can’t easily slide the armrests left and right; that adjustment requires unbolting each arm from the base of the chair and repositioning it.

Solid and Comfortable

The SecretLab Titan’s generous, dense padding and thick PU leather make the chair feel appreciably more sturdy and slightly more comfortable than the DXRacer Racing Series OH/RV001 and RapidX Carbon Line, and the included velour pillow is the softest removable headrest we’ve felt yet. Its built-in lumbar support is much more subtle than the lumbar support cushions included with most other gaming chairs, but the ability to adjust the firmness of where the chair hits the small of your back is a very nice touch, and still leaves the option of using your own lumbar pillow. At $400 it’s on the pricier side, but is comparable with competing models, and it simply feels a bit nicer on all fronts (and backs), making it our new Editors’ Choice for gaming chairs.

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If the 290-pound weight capacity isn’t quite enough for you, the RapidX Carbon Line and AKRacing Max Gaming Chair can respectively handle up to 350 and 400 pounds and feature larger seats for users who prefer the room. That said, they aren’t quite as generous in terms of seat padding, and their PU leather doesn’t feel as supple or thick.



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