Lifestyle Intervention Program Reduces Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome Risk











The M.O.B.I.L.I.S. lifestyle intervention program provides physical activity, psychological interventions, and nutritional counseling for obese patients at risk of developing diabetes.

The M.O.B.I.L.I.S. lifestyle intervention program provides physical activity, psychological interventions, and nutritional counseling for obese patients at risk of developing diabetes.



A 12-month interdisciplinary lifestyle intervention program was found to significantly improve the risk of developing diabetes and metabolic syndrome in obese and prediabetic patients, according to a study published in Obesity Facts.

Researchers from Germany created the M.O.B.I.L.I.S. program, a study that implemented lifestyle changes in moderately obese individuals and tracked weight and metabolic risk factors over a 12-month period. A total of 5884 patients with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 to 40 kg/m2 participated in interdisciplinary group sessions that addressed physical activity (n=41) as well as psychologic interventions addressing self-management (n=12) and nutritional counseling sessions (n=8). Dietary interventions focused on reducing fat consumption and increasing high-quality, high-energy food.

Laboratory analysis included serum triglyceride; total, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol; fasting blood glucose; and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels; these levels were assessed by clinical routine methods before and after the 12-month intervention period. Body weight, height, waist circumference, and resting blood pressure were also determined.

Prediabetes was identified in 2651 patients; of these, 2227 (1684 women, 543 men) were included in the study. Data were collected for body weight, cardiopulmonary fitness, blood pressure, and metabolic parameters. The 12-month lifestyle intervention program was found to significantly reduce body weight (-6%) and waist circumference (-6.8%), and improve physical fitness (15%) in participants of both sexes. Although the number of participants who were men was lower, men were found to have a greater benefit in body weight and body composition, as well as serum triglycerides and LDL cholesterol levels.

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A total of 839 of the 2227 prediabetic participants were found to have normal HbA1c levels (-37.7%) after the intervention and therefore were no longer classified as having prediabetes. Conversely, 66 participants developed type 2 diabetes (2.9%). Of the patients demonstrating symptoms of metabolic syndrome (1641), 766 (46.7%) did not show any signs of syndrome development after the intervention program; however, 120 participants displayed new signs of metabolic syndrome at the conclusion of the program.

“The clinical effects [of the study] are substantial and are likely to reduce the risk of developing diabetes and the prevalence of a full-blown metabolic syndrome in obese [patients ad those with prediabetes],” the authors concluded.

Reference

König D, Hörmann J, Predel H-G, Berg A. A 12-month lifestyle intervention program improves body composition and reduces the prevalence of prediabetes in obese patients. Obes Facts. 2018;11(5):393-399.







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