GM Cuts, Facebook Probe, Ukraine Tensions: CEO Daily for November 26, 2018



Genetic Editing

A Chinese researcher claims to have edited the DNA of twin baby girls in order to make them resistant to HIV. If true, this would be a world first. Many see genetic editing as too dangerous to put into practice just yet, due to the fact that changes could be passed down future generations. Scientists are calling He Jiankui’s claim “unconscionable”—again, there is as yet no independent confirmation that he did what he said he did, though. Bloomberg

Emerging Markets

Emerging markets’ lousy year is unlikely to follow through to next year, according to Morgan Stanley analysts who reckon now’s the time to buy into countries such as India, Peru and Poland. The company forecasts stable growth in emerging markets, but a slowdown in the U.S. that brings with it a weakening of the dollar—good news for emerging markets with dollar-denominated debts. CNBC

May’s Task

The Brexit deal has been approved by the 27 remaining EU member states, and it is now British Prime Minister Theresa May’s task to sell it to her own parliamentarians ahead of a vote in a couple weeks’ time. Rejecting the deal “would open the door to more division and more uncertainty, with all the risks that will entail,” she is expected to tell MPs today. Most observers expect MPs to reject the deal, because it leaves the U.K. worse off than before Brexit—something that has been glaringly obvious since before the 2016 referendum on the issue. Financial Times

Taiwan Elections

Local elections in Taiwan turned out very badly for the independence-leaning DPP party that runs the state, with the relatively pro-Beijing Kuomintang party being the big winner. President Tsai Ing-wen has resigned as the chairwoman of the DPP in response to the results, although she’s still president of Taiwan until 2020. South China Morning Post

This edition of CEO Daily was edited by David Meyer. Find previous editions here, and sign up for other Fortune newsletters here.

ALSO READ   Gmail's new 'confidential mode' offers more privacy controls — but don't get too comfortable





READ SOURCE

Leave a Reply