CCHS grant promotes healthier lifestyle




Allen Worrell/The Carroll News Carroll County High School teacher and baseball coach Kevin DeHaven fills out a survey for student Constance Carico on Nov. 15 at CCHS. A new grant has sparked an initiative at Carroll County High School aimed at making the school healthier by promoting tobacco-free lifestyles and better breakfast options. –

Nathan Bowers (left) fills out a student survey as Maggie Fulk (center) and Emily Hawks look on Nov. 14 at Carroll County High School. A new grant has sparked an initiative at Carroll County High School aimed at making the school healthier by promoting tobacco-free lifestyles and better breakfast options. –

Students participating in training for Y Street programs aimed at making Carroll County High School a tobacco-free campus as well as promoting healthier breakfasts gather for a group photo Nov. 14. –

A new grant has sparked an initiative at Carroll County High School aimed at making the school healthier by promoting tobacco-free lifestyles and better breakfast options.

CCHS is one of just 24 partners across the state to receive the Y Street grant – an initiative from the Virginia Foundation for Healthy Youths. Gabby Levet was one of two program leaders from Washington, D.C. who came to the Hillsville high school Nov. 14 to begin implementing the program. Levet said the group tries to tackle both problems by changing the laws within school systems and school divisions.

“We train these high schoolers to promote healthier school systems and tobacco-free school systems,” Levet said. “One of the campaigns right now is 24/7, which is 24 hours-a-day, seven-days-a-week tobacco-free schools, and to help school systems adopt those comprehensive policies to fill in those loopholes and make sure there is no tobacco use on school grounds, both before, after and during school, outside and inside. Great Starts with Breakfast is our second campaign and we are trying to promote breakfast participation, increasing breakfast participation while also trying to improve the quality of breakfast, so we help schools adopt alternative breakfast models.”

ALSO READ   London Fashion Week: Victoria Beckham brings it home

The breakfast program features three options, beginning with breakfast in the class, which is designed to normalize breakfast into the regular bell schedule of a school or school system. The second is “grab and go,” which is a convenient option for students to grab food on the way to class. The third option is extended breakfast, which enables students to swing by the cafeteria to grab some food after their first-period class to take into their second-period class.

“We are trying to recognize that there are all these barriers for kids – transportation to school on time, whether it’s the stigma, whether it’s not liking the food, all these things, to having a healthy balanced breakfast and so we are working to change to those things,” Levet said.

On Nov. 14, Levet and members of the Y Street program came to Carroll County High School to recruit and train students for the program. Along with a half day of training, participating students also were provided healthy breakfasts and lunches and were taught everything they needed to know about the issues themselves, as well as the campaigns to address those issues.

After training, students began the three-step process for policy change. The first step included gauging public opinion by surveying other students and CCHS faculty members. Levet said the second step is public support – raising awareness so that people understand the issues and that others are working for change. The third step is meetings of stakeholders and decision-makers.

“We train high schoolers how to meet with their principals, nutrition directors, as well as attending school board meetings to advocate for these policy changes, as well as demonstrate the data effectively that they have collected through the surveys so it all builds on each other,” Levet said. “We are super excited about Carroll County because they are actually a new school to the Y Street team. It also means there is a lot of work they will have the opportunity to do and get involved in, and hopefully they hit the ground running.”

ALSO READ   Across China: "Toilet revolution" brings healthy lifestyle to western China

As one of 24 grantees in the state funded by the Virginia Foundation for Healthy Youth, CCHS will have milestones throughout the year that the school will have to meet in order to receive up to $2,000 in funding.

“There are great opportunities for them to then use that money on both the clubs that are affiliated with Y Street at each school as well as other healthy behavior change opportunities, and promoting that through the money that we fund them with,” Levet said.

Susan Rose, a culinary arts teacher at CCHS, found out about the grant last year at the state leadership conference for Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA).A representative at the conference encouraged Rose to apply since Carroll County is in a tobacco-growing area.

“CCHS won and it is a total of $2,000 we can be awarded over and above anything the kids get. And we use that for our programs and to go on trips and to implement our programs and many other things,” Rose said. “It’s mainly through FCCLA and the Family Consumer Science classes, and then we had several that aren’t in our classes, but saw it in the cafeteria. There are many great incentives such as gift cards, cash prizes, and even scholarships associated with this program. Those are good incentives for the students, but they can also meet with the school board members and come up with their own projects.”

Rose said some CCHS students will also participate in an associated program called Rev Your Bev, a statewide campaign to raise awareness about the health effects of sugary drinks. She is particularly excited about increased steps to make Carroll County High School free of tobacco.

ALSO READ   Living The Linux Laptop Lifestyle

“I can tell you football games drive me insane because people go out – it’s adults – they smoke and this is supposed to be a tobacco-free campus, but I think the adults abuse it more than the students do,” Rose said.

Allen Worrell can be reached at (276) 779-4062 or on Twitter@AWorrellTCN

Allen Worrell/The Carroll News Carroll County High School teacher and baseball coach Kevin DeHaven fills out a survey for student Constance Carico on Nov. 15 at CCHS. A new grant has sparked an initiative at Carroll County High School aimed at making the school healthier by promoting tobacco-free lifestyles and better breakfast options.

Nathan Bowers (left) fills out a student survey as Maggie Fulk (center) and Emily Hawks look on Nov. 14 at Carroll County High School. A new grant has sparked an initiative at Carroll County High School aimed at making the school healthier by promoting tobacco-free lifestyles and better breakfast options.

Students participating in training for Y Street programs aimed at making Carroll County High School a tobacco-free campus as well as promoting healthier breakfasts gather for a group photo Nov. 14.



READ SOURCE

Leave a Reply